Identifying your startup drive

Before you start up the tour disk, you need to know which disk drive is your startup drive. The startup drive is the one in which the computer looks first for a startup disk—a disk containing the software the computer needs in order to run.

Use these guidelines to identify your startup drive:

If you have only one drive, it is automatically your startup drive.

If you have two or more drives of the same size (both 3.5-inch drives or both 5.25-inch drives), the startup drive is the one connected directly to the disk drive port on the back panel of the computer. (If you affixed the disk drive labels as recommended in the previous chapter, drive 1 is the startup drive.)

If you have both a 5.25-inch drive and a 3.5-inch drive connected to the computer, the 5.25-inch drive is your startup drive. If you want the computer to start up from a disk in your 3.5-inch drive instead—for example, when you want to use the Apple IIGS tour disk—make sure the 5.25-inch drive is empty and its door is open. When the computer can't find a disk in the 5.25-inch drive, it checks the 3.5-inch drive next.

If you have drives connected to the computer's internal slots, the startup drive is the one connected to the card in the highest-numbered slot. (For information on connecting devices to the computer's internal slots, see Appendix A of the Apple IIGS Owner's Reference.)

If you have two drives of the same type connected to the card in the highest-numbered slot, the startup drive is the one attached to the connector labeled drive 1 on the card.

It's possible to change the startup drive. You'll learn how to do so in Chapter 9 of the Apple IIGS Owner's Reference.

 

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Chapter 2: Getting Started: A Hands-On Tutorial